A garden that goes with the grain.

Scree garden and grain silo at The Cottage Herbery

This unique landscape speaks of its farming heritage by taking cues from the agricultural buildings, which have been left in situ and reclaimed by time, the elements and its hospitable owners, Rob and Kim Hurst, who have upcycled on a grand scale.

Steel structures, like the monumental Dutch barn, which once housed a hop machine, have been partly deconstructed and repurposed as rustic garden rooms and prodigious plant supports clothed in colossal climbers.

A scree garden seamlessly segues into a swimming pond, serving up a coastal vibe in this exposed site beneath big, blustery skies. A grain-silo-come-beech-hut, is home to a fanatical filtration system, which preserves crystal clear waters.

From its peat-free beginnings in 1976 to the numerous awards, including Chelsea Gold Medals, this inspiring family-run nursery, in the Teme Valley, continues to set the gold standard for growing quality herbs, aromatic plants and hardy perennials.

The nursery and garden are not usually open to the public, instead offering garden and plant enthusiasts the opportunity to visit, usually followed by teas in the barn or garden, if weather permits. For further details visit: www.thecottageherbery.co.uk

Modern Gardens Magazine

Modern Gardens_DPS

It was a lovely surprise to have received a mention in Modern Gardens (April 2017 – Issue 13) and see what everybody else is getting up to in the ‘WE LOVE OUTDOOR LIVING’ section of its magazine. This magnificent monthly chimes perfectly with my belief that gardening should be accessible to all and provide an opportunity for rehabilitation and reinterpreting an age-old British pastime. It’s packed full of inspiring projects and scintillating shares by readers of all means and backgrounds, breaking down barriers and adding to the sense of belonging and community, while giving you aspirations for your own garden. I love it!

Modern Gardens_EXT Close Up

Within the past 8 years I have spent a great deal of my time completely reworking a pre-war garden, retaining and reusing existing materials and sympathetically incorporating a number of new materials, design elements and specimen plants. The design of this garden has water at its heart and features exotic planting and Eastern sculptures alongside more traditional influences and planting schemes. I created this circular paved seating area, adjacent to the pond, choosing furniture that adds height and elevates me above the water. The burnt orange of the Hemerocallis fulva ‘Flore Pleno’, the brilliant red of Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’, and the hot pink of the Drosanthemum were new additions, last year, successfully transporting me to more exotic climes.

Exotic entertaining

Hemerocallis (Daylily) and Dahlia have both undergone something of a revival of late and I can’t think of enough superlatives to sum up these show-stopping sirens. Take Hemerocallis, for example – yesterday, they were nowhere to be seen and today they’re trumpeting temptresses! Individual flowers are short-lived, (hence their name) but plants can produce a profusion of flowers, in succession, which could last for many weeks. Hemerocallis fulva ‘Flore Pleno’ certainly packs a pyrotechnic punch: like a dragon, spewing forth flames, it’s exceptionally exotic-looking and befitting of its primarily Eastern Asian roots, where dragons are usually a beneficent symbol of fertility, associated with water and the heavens. ‘Flore Pleno’ certainly fits the bill!